yes I’m 5’3”

2bainzz:

amaired84:

2bainzz:

get over it

Won’t be very difficult

ouch

(via bewbin)


tsunamiwavesurfing:

this why yall tagged/me game need to be on point

(via pizza)



jinoras-light:

I’m sure he’d be proud too

(via myneighborsomaro)



kane52630:

Gotham Symphony

Based on themes written by Danny Elfman, Shirley Walker and Hans Zimmer.
Arranged by OminousVoice

(via lyrafay)


thatfunnyblog:

The American collegiate system in one gif set

(via killstealington)


donskoi:

my mother just sent me this photo and I

donskoi:

my mother just sent me this photo and I

(via inked-duckies)


makanidotdot:

this is my only hypothesis

(via silentskyline)


panosexual:

thewomanofkleenex:

During the first season or two of Roseanne, Roseanne Barr was treated horribly by the producers, who wanted to get rid of her, even though she was the creative genius behind the show, which was based entirely on characters she had developed. She went with “success is the best revenge,” working extra hard to make sure the show hit the #1 spot, knowing at that point she could seize creative control. She hung out with the crew and supportive castmembers (including John Goodman, who flat refused to do the show without her), and put a list on her door. That list had the name of every single person who worked on the show. When they pissed her off, she’d cross off their name in red. Everyone in red was to be fired the second she was in charge. She took this policy from Machiavelli, and she made good on it. Her first move was to fire everyone who had tried to shut her down. She also promoted a number of women writers and fired a number of men writers for being sexist. So, this shirt is no lie.

panosexual:

thewomanofkleenex:

During the first season or two of Roseanne, Roseanne Barr was treated horribly by the producers, who wanted to get rid of her, even though she was the creative genius behind the show, which was based entirely on characters she had developed. She went with “success is the best revenge,” working extra hard to make sure the show hit the #1 spot, knowing at that point she could seize creative control. She hung out with the crew and supportive castmembers (including John Goodman, who flat refused to do the show without her), and put a list on her door. That list had the name of every single person who worked on the show. When they pissed her off, she’d cross off their name in red. Everyone in red was to be fired the second she was in charge. She took this policy from Machiavelli, and she made good on it. Her first move was to fire everyone who had tried to shut her down. She also promoted a number of women writers and fired a number of men writers for being sexist. So, this shirt is no lie.

image

(via inked-duckies)


disvalue:

all i think about is sex and what i am going to eat next

(via son-of-king-priam)


nicolewet:

handslikebirdman:

kaiserneko:

mewtwoofficial:

globegander:

I love this show.

he’s beating his meat to Raven’s legs

his shiRT SAYS “FOOD PUN”

Hate this show but lmao

Omfg.

nicolewet:

handslikebirdman:

kaiserneko:

mewtwoofficial:

globegander:

I love this show.

he’s beating his meat to Raven’s legs

his shiRT SAYS “FOOD PUN

Hate this show but lmao

Omfg.

(via lyrafay)


theauthoryperson:

egberts:

i deleted my blog and tumblr immediately asked me if i want to sign up again

and here you are

theauthoryperson:

egberts:

i deleted my blog and tumblr immediately asked me if i want to sign up again

and here you are

(via pizza)



What You Can Do [To Name The Problem Of Male Violence]

1. Replace the phrase “violence against women,” everywhere you or your feminist organizations currently use it, with the phrase “male violence against women” or possibly “male-pattern violence against women.”

2. Specifically name the most prevalent kind of domestic violence as “male-pattern violence in the home.”

3. When writing and speaking about male-pattern violence, actively name the perpetrator or at least the gender of the perpetrator: “A man raped a woman.” Do away with expressions such as “a woman was raped,” “her rapist” and every kind of wording that focuses on rape as a problem only for women.

4. Wherever possible, present statistics about violence in ways that clearly indicate the gender of the perpetrator, not just of the victim: Instead of “Every 15 minutes a woman is raped,” which makes rape seem like a female problem, try “Every 15 minutes, a man rapes a woman.” Or better: “Every 15 minutes, a man commits a rape.”

5. Call people on their defensiveness against acknowledging male violence. Watch for the classic defenses (see Ways People Deny Male Violence) and point them out.

6. Know the statistics and cite them often.

7. Talk about male-pattern violence openly and constantly. Make sure everyone you know is aware of this particularly masculine problem. Discuss it with your children. Discuss it with male friends. Discuss it with female friends. Discuss it in classrooms, in gossip sessions, and in bars.

8. Study the phenomenon. Examine how the construction of masculinity contributes to the commission of violence. Read what researchers such as James Gilligan are finding about why men become violent.

9. Encourage men to explore and question the cult of masculinity. If you are a man, call other men on their unexamined acceptance of mainstream masculinity.

10. Don’t accept male violence. Make it stop.

Jennie Ruby, Male Pattern Violence [X] (via witchbornwitch)

(via thetalkingguineapig)